PneuDuino

Tools @ MIT Media Lab | 2014 – 2016 | In collaboration with >Felix Heibeck<

Pneuduino is a hardware platform for kids, students, artists, designers, researchers who are interested in controlling air flow and pressure for their projects. visit the toolkit page for more information ( http://www.pneuduino.org/ )

Hardware | The hardware is open source and can be programmed using the Arduino IDE. Currently there are 4 different modules:

This module is the hero of Pneuduino as it is built to control air flow and read air pressure. Two solenoid valves on the board allow allow full control of one, or partial control of two air bladders. The pressure sensor can read values up to 58 PSI and the four LEDs under the sensor show the pressure. The board can be controlled from a Master Board and the Pneuduino library or, for simple applications, it can be used individually by programming and powering it directly through the FTDI header. At the board’s heart is a ATMega328P that registers as Arduino Pro when programmed directly.

This module is the hero of Pneuduino as it is built to control air flow and read air pressure. Two solenoid valves on the board allow allow full control of one, or partial control of two air bladders. The pressure sensor can read values up to 58 PSI and the four LEDs under the sensor show the pressure. The board can be controlled from a Master Board and the Pneuduino library or, for simple applications, it can be used individually by programming and powering it directly through the FTDI header. At the board’s heart is a ATMega328P that registers as Arduino Pro when programmed directly.

When you need a simple button to trigger an event, or a dial to tweak a parameter, this board is very useful. It features two push-buttons and a potentiometer and can be directly connected to the Master Board. Reading the buttons is afforded by dedicated methods of the Pneuduino library.

If you want to add an extra sensor, LED or other peripheral to your pneumatic system, you can use this board to connect any 5V compatible I2C device. We designed it with the Grove kit I2C header, because we don’t like to be stopped by soldering when we are prototyping.

WorkShops | The Pneuduino toolkit is currently used in workshops with high school or college students. While each workshop has a different focus, they all introduce concepts of air as actuator and sensor as well as different fabrication methods to create transforming artifacts. Workshops haven been held in Boston, Tokyo, London, Eindhoven, Linz, etc.